WRITING RACE

“…identities are the names we give to the different ways we are positioned by, and position ourselves within, the narratives of the past.”
- Stuart Hall

Welcome to the Royal Historical Society’s new blog series!

  • Do you work on race and its relationship to history, broadly defined?
  • Have you tackled issues related to race within the classroom, at university, in the museum?
  • And are you looking for a way to reflect upon your experiences, and analyse and share your thoughts?

‘Writing Race’ is keen to amplify your voice. We recognise that more formal means of publishing and disseminating race-related work takes time, and is not for everyone. We are looking for posts that are about 1,000 words in length, and can offer you advice on how to sharpen your writing for our blog series.  And we will promote your posts through our social media channels, ensuring your thoughts get the reach they deserve.

Contact Us

If you’d like to write for the series, contact the blog series editor, Dr Diya Gupta, with your pitches.
Email: diya.gupta@royalhistsoc.org

 

Recent Posts in this Series

Why Historically-white Sororities and Fraternities are racially problematic in US universities

Why Historically-white Sororities and Fraternities are racially problematic in US universities

‘Greek Life’ is a distinctive part of the social and cultural experience of universities in the United States, and has faced recent scrutiny for acts of racism, sexism and homophobia. Yet, as Dr Taulby Edmondson argues here — in the latest article in the ‘Writing Race’ series — the existence of longstanding Black sororities and fraternities complicate calls for an end to this culture. Studying how minorities use and transform predominantly white institutions raises questions about how we go about deconstructing the white supremacy within them.

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Cannabis, Race, and Mental Illness in Britain, 1980-1993

Cannabis, Race, and Mental Illness in Britain, 1980-1993

For the ninth post in the RHS ‘Writing Race’ blog series, Jamie Banks investigates ‘cannabis psychosis’ and its disproportionate diagnosis amongst Britain’s Afro-Caribbean communities. Studying this intersection of medicine, culture, and policing brings to light the methodological difficulties around motivation and responsibility which racism poses for historians. 

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‘The women had saved the situation’: Indian women’s work in war and famine

‘The women had saved the situation’: Indian women’s work in war and famine

The work undertaken by lower caste Indian women during Second World War is both surprising and shocking. In the fourth post in the ‘Writing Race’ series, Urvi Khaitan reveals how many thousands of women worked above and below ground in mines or for the Labour Corps to support the allied war effort. Today their contributions and hardships remain little known.

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