Beyond Peterloo: The Founding of the Manchester Guardian

It is well-known that the events of the Peterloo Massacre, which occurred two hundred years ago today, on 16 August 1819, inspired the founding of the Manchester Guardian. These roots are today still recognised by the Guardian (which the Manchester Guardian would later become). However, a closer look at the original prospectus reveals that despite being founded in the wake Peterloo, the events of 16th August 1819 and the cause of parliamentary reform were not the only motives behind the newspaper’s establishment. In this post, Kathy Davies, a PhD student in History at Sheffield Hallam University, looks more closely at the Manchester Guardian’s long-standing concern with foreign politics. Continue reading “Beyond Peterloo: The Founding of the Manchester Guardian”

Beyond This Day – 8 August 1940: Popular History and the Power Sisters

The historian Eileen Power died on 8 August 1940. In this blog post, Dr Laura Carter examines the historical legacy of Rhoda Power, Eileen’s younger sister (pictured above). In the decades following Eileen’s death, Rhoda continued to shape popular social history in Britain in quite distinctive ways that have been overshadowed by Eileen’s immortalisation as the emblematic twentieth-century woman historian. Continue reading “Beyond This Day – 8 August 1940: Popular History and the Power Sisters”

A Cultural History of Irish Identity on Display

Shahmima Akhtar joined the Royal Historical Society in July 2019 as Past and Present Fellow: Race, Ethnicity & Equality in History. Over the next two years Shahmima will work with the Royal Historical Society and the Institute for Historical Research … Continue reading A Cultural History of Irish Identity on Display

Insta-Research: Social Media and the Historian

As a scholar working in a rural UK university, far from peers in her field of study, Kate Strasdin decided to embrace Instagram and Twitter as a means of professional engagement, and to explore the potential for virtual communication when travel to conferences and urban-centric events was rarely possible. In this post for Historical Transactions she explains that social media has been a rewarding and enlightening professional experience. Continue reading “Insta-Research: Social Media and the Historian”

A Seven-Year-Old Monster

The Many-Headed Monster is one of the longest-running and most successful of academic historical blogs. It was founded, and is still run, by Dr Mark Hailwood (Bristol), Dr Laura Sangha (Exeter), Dr Brodie Waddell (Birkbeck), and Dr Jonathan Willis (Birmingham), four early-modern historians who met while studying for postgraduate degrees at the University of Warwick in the mid-2000s. To mark the Monster’s seventh birthday, we asked the team to reflect on their motivation, the editorial challenges and, most importantly, the secret of the blog’s continued success… Continue reading “A Seven-Year-Old Monster”

Charting a Course: From Shock Cities to Sexy Sailors (and Pilgrim Fathers)

Tom Hulme is author of After the Shock City: Urban Culture and the Making of Modern Citizenship, available now in the RHS Studies on History Series with Boydell and Brewer. In this post for the Historical Transactions blog, he considers how the threads from that project continue to weave through two very different new historical ventures. Continue reading “Charting a Course: From Shock Cities to Sexy Sailors (and Pilgrim Fathers)”

Cataloguing the RHS Archive: George Prothero’s Papers

As part of the Society’s 150th anniversary celebrations, the RHS has embarked on a project to revamp its archive and update its accompanying catalogue, in order to improve the accessibility of the collections and to increase awareness of Society’s past. The project is funded by the Marc Fitch Fund, a charity which supports projects aimed at preserving and showcasing important pieces of historical scholarship across the UK and the Republic of Ireland. With this generous award, the Society has been able to hire two post-graduate researchers, Eilish Gregory and Imogen Evans, to help complete the project. In this post for Historical Transactions, Eilish and Imogen introduce the project, and reveal some of their early finds in the papers of George Prothero, the Society’s first President. Continue reading “Cataloguing the RHS Archive: George Prothero’s Papers”