Student numbers for History A-Levels and Scottish Highers, 2023

Student numbers for History A-Levels and Scottish Highers, 2023

The 2023 A-Level results, for students in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, were released on 17 August 2023. They follow the 2023 results for Scottish Highers, published on 8 August. Both sets of data allow for observations on the uptake and relative popularity of History, and of arts and humanities subjects more generally, in 2022-23. This post draws on figures published in August by the Joint Council for Qualifications (for England, Wales and Northern Ireland, JCQ) and the Scottish Qualifications Authority SQA).

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Gendering Violence in the Past

Gendering Violence in the Past

In her new article, now published in ‘Transactions of the Royal Historical Society’, Dr Victoria Leonard analyses the letters of St Augustine of Hippo, and demonstrates how their ‘silences’ convey the erasure of gendered violence and queer sexuality in antiquity. Here, Victoria draws on her research to demonstrate how an absence of primary source evidence can be just as informative as an abundance; and how historians can use these silences to gain deeper insight into the past. Victoria’s Open Access article, ‘Gendered Violence, Victim Credibility and Adjudicating Justice in Augustine’s Letters’, is now available – Open Access – via the FirstView section of the journal’s website.

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The Impulse of the Present

The Impulse of the Present

In this third and final post in our ‘History and Human Flourishing’ series, David Armitage considers longstanding debates, and new writing, on the value of presentist thinking for historical debate. For many – past and present – presentism serves to deflect and distort from the historian’s true purpose and the distinctiveness of the discipline. Here David draws on recent work by historians of science, as well as by psychologists and philosophers, to advocate for the advantages of presentist thinking. Far from distortion or deflection, history informed by presentism offers greater possibilities for dialogue with multiple publics and greater humility on the part of practitioners and readers.

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Flourishing with Herodotus

Flourishing with Herodotus

In this second post of the ‘History and Human Flourishing’ series, Suzanne Marchand explores the contemporary value and relevance of Herodotus in historical teaching and methodology. Though often overlooked in favour of a ‘scientific’ approach advocated by nineteenth-century acolytes of Thucydides, Herodotus and his Histories remain a rich — and much needed — guide to history as the story and study of human behaviours. In this post, Suzanne considers Herodotus’ appeal and lessons for historians today. This post is the second essay in the Society’s 3-part ‘History & Human Flourishing’ blog series. The first, by Darrin M. McMahon, explores the often-neglected study of the history of human happiness. 

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History and Human Flourishing

History and Human Flourishing

How might history and historians enhance human flourishing, if at all? In this post – the first of three considering ‘History and Human Flourishing’ – Darrin McMahon considers the historical study of happiness as an approach to the past. Histories of happiness are more than the pursuit of perpetual good feelings and they exist alongside the ubiquitous suffering of the world, in the past and the present alike. As editor of a new volume, ‘History and Human Flourishing’ (2023), Darrin proposes important questions for a discipline about which some are sceptical: to consider how the study of history can promote happiness and wellbeing in the present, and the value of history for life, that is, for human flourishing.

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On Writing a Historiography of Western Sport in Colonial India

On Writing a Historiography of Western Sport in Colonial India

In her new article, published in ‘Transactions of the Royal Historical Society’, Subhadipa Dutta offers a historiographical review of the history of Western sport in colonial India. In this post, Subhadipa explains how she came to her subject as a PhD researcher, and how her research broadens understanding of sport in colonial India beyond the establish focus on adult male participants. Her article is one of the first essays in the journal’s new ‘Common Room’ section: a space for topical commentary on all aspects of historical research, to which submissions are warmly welcome.

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Jehan Creton’s ‘Prinse et mort du roy Richart d’Angleterre’

Jehan Creton’s ‘Prinse et mort du roy Richart d’Angleterre’

The latest volume in the Royal Historical Society’s Camden Series is published in June: ‘La Prinse et Mort du Roy Richart d’Angleterre, and Other Works by Jehan Creton’, translated and edited by Lorna A. Finlay. Jehan Creton accompanied Richard II on his expedition to Ireland in 1399 and witnessed the king’s capture by Henry Lancaster, who usurped the throne to reign as Henry IV. Lorna Finlay’s new translation and edition is the first since that of John Webb, published in 1824. This new Camden edition also includes Creton’s other known writings: the two epistles and four ballades.

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Windrush 75: UK History-related events in June 2023

Windrush 75: UK History-related events in June 2023

22 June 2023 marks the 75th anniversary of the arrival of HMT Empire Windrush at Tilbury Docks in Essex. The ship brought to Britain just over 800 passengers who had left the West Indies, the great majority of whom sought to settle and begin new lives in the UK. The Windrush 75 anniversary is being marked in 2023 with events, exhibitions and broadcasts. This post offers a selection of history-related events. They include academic conferences, lectures and seminars, alongside exhibitions, community history events and performances, from organisations large and small. They are a small selection of what’s available.

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RHS ALEXANDER PRIZE – THE 2023 SHORTLIST

RHS ALEXANDER PRIZE – THE 2023 SHORTLIST

Each year, the Royal Historical Society awards its Alexander Prize alongside the Gladstone and Whitfield Book Prizes. The RHS Alexander Prize is awarded for an essay or article based on original historical research, by a doctoral candidate or those recently awarded their doctorate, published in a journal or an edited collection of essays. The 2023 Alexander Prize Shortlist of six articles or book chapters – published in 2022 – was announced on 1 June. The winner of this year’s Alexander Prize will be announced in late June / early July.

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RHS Gladstone Book Prize – the 2023 Shortlist

RHS Gladstone Book Prize – the 2023 Shortlist

Each year, the Royal Historical Society awards two book prizes for a first solely authored monograph. The RHS Gladstone Prize is for first books by historians writing an an aspect of European or World History beyond the British Isles. The RHS Whitfield Prize is for first books in the field of British or Irish History. The 2023 Gladstone Prize Shortlist of six books – published in 2022 – was announced on 31 May. The winner of this year’s Gladstone Prize will be announced in late June / early July.

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RHS WHITFIELD BOOK PRIZE – THE 2023 SHORTLIST

RHS WHITFIELD BOOK PRIZE – THE 2023 SHORTLIST

Each year, the Royal Historical Society awards two book prizes for a first solely authored monograph. The RHS Whitfield Prize is for first books by historians writing an an aspect of British or Irish History. The RHS Gladstone Prize is for first books in the field of European and World History beyond the British Isles. The 2023 Whitfield Prize Shortlist of six books – published in 2022 – was announced on 30 May. The winner of this year’s Whitfield Prize will be announced in late June / early July.

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Conversing with Historians about Mid-Career

Conversing with Historians about Mid-Career

In February 2023, the Royal Historical Society launched its ‘Mid-Career Conversations for Historians’ series. This initial series includes five themed events, hosted by Professor Julian Wright, the Society’s Secretary for Professional Engagement.The series provides a small and confidential forum for historians to discuss topics of particular relevance to them at the mid-career stage. It allows historians to share their problems, interests, priorities and solutions, and to consider new avenues for developing their career and professional networks. In this post Julian reflects on these initial discussions and what he’s learned from colleagues during these events.

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