Race, Ethnicity and Equality at the RHS

The Royal Historical Society (RHS) published its Race, Ethnicity and Equality in History report in October 2018. The report highlighted racial and ethnic inequalities in the teaching and practice of History in the UK.

It drew attention to the underrepresentation of ‘Black and Minority Ethnic’ (BME) students and staff in university History programmes, the substantial levels of race-based bias and discrimination experienced by such historians in UK universities, and the negative impact of narrow school and university curriculums on diversity and inclusion. The report, a key component of the Society’s 150th anniversary programme, was founded upon a year of research and a survey of over 700 university-based historians.

Today, the legacy of the 2018 report continues. Along with the two subsequent roadmaps published in 2019 and 2020, the report offers relevant, practical advice and guidance for academic historians on taking positive action to address and diminish barriers to equality in the discipline.

Find out more about the working group and its ongoing work on the RHS website.

This page provides links to:

  • Publications from the RHS on Race, Ethnicity and Equality
  • Useful Links and External Resources for historians
  • Writing Race – a new blog series of blog posts by the current Past & Present Fellow Dr Diya Gupta
  • Race Update – a blog series from 2019-2020 by former Past & Present Fellow Dr Shahmima Akhtar

Recent blog posts on Race, Ethnicity and Equality

Deconstructing Empire: Co-Producing with Young People

Deconstructing Empire: Co-Producing with Young People

  'We wanted to create a space where people could speak their truths, they could feel they were representing themselves.'  - Poet in the City Producer, 2018 In this latest post in the 'Writing Race' series, Sarisha Kumar, Head of Talent at Poet in the City,...

What is History For? 2: activism and historical imagination

What is History For? 2: activism and historical imagination

    In this second post in the 'What is History For?' series, Tionne Parris considers the examples set by mid-20th-century Black radical women in their struggle for change. How might historical study of their engagement with, and framing of, activism shape...

Engaging with the ‘Un-Commemorated’ Past

Engaging with the ‘Un-Commemorated’ Past

  What does it mean to engage audiences with complex and traumatic histories of empire and war? And how might we engage with the ‘un-commemorated’, whose names have not appeared on the memorial landscape? Dr Diya Gupta (Royal Historical Society) and Dr Anna...