A Seven-Year-Old Monster

The Many-Headed Monster is one of the longest-running and most successful of academic historical blogs. It was founded, and is still run, by Dr Mark Hailwood (Bristol), Dr Laura Sangha (Exeter), Dr Brodie Waddell (Birkbeck), and Dr Jonathan Willis (Birmingham), four early-modern historians who met while studying for postgraduate degrees at the University of Warwick in the mid-2000s. To mark the Monster’s seventh birthday, we asked the team to reflect on their motivation, the editorial challenges and, most importantly, the secret of the blog’s continued success… Continue reading “A Seven-Year-Old Monster”

Charting a Course: From Shock Cities to Sexy Sailors (and Pilgrim Fathers)

Tom Hulme is author of After the Shock City: Urban Culture and the Making of Modern Citizenship, available now in the RHS Studies on History Series with Boydell and Brewer. In this post for the Historical Transactions blog, he considers how the threads from that project continue to weave through two very different new historical ventures. Continue reading “Charting a Course: From Shock Cities to Sexy Sailors (and Pilgrim Fathers)”

Cataloguing the RHS Archive: George Prothero’s Papers

As part of the Society’s 150th anniversary celebrations, the RHS has embarked on a project to revamp its archive and update its accompanying catalogue, in order to improve the accessibility of the collections and to increase awareness of Society’s past. The project is funded by the Marc Fitch Fund, a charity which supports projects aimed at preserving and showcasing important pieces of historical scholarship across the UK and the Republic of Ireland. With this generous award, the Society has been able to hire two post-graduate researchers, Eilish Gregory and Imogen Evans, to help complete the project. In this post for Historical Transactions, Eilish and Imogen introduce the project, and reveal some of their early finds in the papers of George Prothero, the Society’s first President. Continue reading “Cataloguing the RHS Archive: George Prothero’s Papers”

A Historian and his Times: Sushil Chaudhury and the History of Eighteenth-Century Bengal

Professor Sushil Chaudhury, historian of eighteenth-century Bengal, and General President Elect of the Indian History Congress, died earlier this year. In this piece for the RHS blog, Professor Peter J. Marshall places his friend’s work in the context of his life, and reflects on how historical scholarship about the region has changed. Continue reading “A Historian and his Times: Sushil Chaudhury and the History of Eighteenth-Century Bengal”

Writing a History Textbook: Seven Things I’ve Learnt

Matthew McCormack has recently finished writing Citizenship and Gender in Britain, 1688-1928.  A textbook aimed at the student market, it will be published by Routledge in June 2019. In this post for Historical Transactions, Matthew shares how the process differed from his other academic publications, and the things he learned along the way. Continue reading “Writing a History Textbook: Seven Things I’ve Learnt”