Beyond Peterloo: The Founding of the Manchester Guardian

It is well-known that the events of the Peterloo Massacre, which occurred two hundred years ago today, on 16 August 1819, inspired the founding of the Manchester Guardian. These roots are today still recognised by the Guardian (which the Manchester Guardian would later become). However, a closer look at the original prospectus reveals that despite being founded in the wake Peterloo, the events of 16th August 1819 and the cause of parliamentary reform were not the only motives behind the newspaper’s establishment. In this post, Kathy Davies, a PhD student in History at Sheffield Hallam University, looks more closely at the Manchester Guardian’s long-standing concern with foreign politics. Continue reading “Beyond Peterloo: The Founding of the Manchester Guardian”

Cataloguing the RHS Archive: George Prothero’s Papers

As part of the Society’s 150th anniversary celebrations, the RHS has embarked on a project to revamp its archive and update its accompanying catalogue, in order to improve the accessibility of the collections and to increase awareness of Society’s past. The project is funded by the Marc Fitch Fund, a charity which supports projects aimed at preserving and showcasing important pieces of historical scholarship across the UK and the Republic of Ireland. With this generous award, the Society has been able to hire two post-graduate researchers, Eilish Gregory and Imogen Evans, to help complete the project. In this post for Historical Transactions, Eilish and Imogen introduce the project, and reveal some of their early finds in the papers of George Prothero, the Society’s first President. Continue reading “Cataloguing the RHS Archive: George Prothero’s Papers”

A Historian and his Times: Sushil Chaudhury and the History of Eighteenth-Century Bengal

Professor Sushil Chaudhury, historian of eighteenth-century Bengal, and General President Elect of the Indian History Congress, died earlier this year. In this piece for the RHS blog, Professor Peter J. Marshall places his friend’s work in the context of his life, and reflects on how historical scholarship about the region has changed. Continue reading “A Historian and his Times: Sushil Chaudhury and the History of Eighteenth-Century Bengal”

Writing a History Textbook: Seven Things I’ve Learnt

Matthew McCormack has recently finished writing Citizenship and Gender in Britain, 1688-1928.  A textbook aimed at the student market, it will be published by Routledge in June 2019. In this post for Historical Transactions, Matthew shares how the process differed from his other academic publications, and the things he learned along the way. Continue reading “Writing a History Textbook: Seven Things I’ve Learnt”

Reflections on “Contested Commemorations”, RHS Symposium at the Open University.

On 17 May 2019 the Open University History department hosted a Royal Historical Society symposium to reflect on the centenary of the First World War. Following four years of commemorative activity, our aim with “Contested Commemorations” was to assess how a range of countries and regions had marked the centenary. Vincent Trott reports on a day of  fascinating presentations and lively discussion. Continue reading “Reflections on “Contested Commemorations”, RHS Symposium at the Open University.”