Black British History: A New IHR Seminar Series

Join us for the first IHR Black British History Seminar on Thursday 23rd January at LSBU. The series: ‘Black British History: Concepts, Geographies, Debates’ encompasses Black British History in all its forms. It takes research from those within and beyond the...

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Race Update 1 – Highlights from 2019 Reports

Race Update 1 – Highlights from 2019 Reports

In this new series, Dr Shahmima Akhtar, Past & Present Fellow for the Royal Historical Society’s Race, Ethnicity & Equality in History initiative will post on subjects related to race, ethnicity and equality in UK History Higher Education (from reviewing publications to events and initiatives), on a bi-monthly basis. Follow the blog to receive all the updates by email

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How Can Historians Achieve Inclusivity in Digital Archives?

How Can Historians Achieve Inclusivity in Digital Archives?

Historians have always been preoccupied with archives of knowledge – how information is stored and categorised, how it is accessed or restricted, how the integrity of evidence is determined. These are universal questions for those who study the past. They also theoretically underpin the largest and most influential archive of knowledge in human history: Wikipedia. Dr Victoria Leonard considers Wikipedia’s problems – and its possibilities.

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Professor Emma Griffin: Introducing the next President-Elect

Professor Emma Griffin: Introducing the next President-Elect

The Royal Historical Society will formally announce the appointment of  our new President-Elect at its AGM this evening. We asked Emma Griffin, Professor of Modern British History at the University of East Anglia to introduce herself, her research and her reasons for taking on this role.

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Historians, wildlife, and habitats

Historians, wildlife, and habitats

Why do we study the past? One reason is to understand the present, and how the things we think of as ‘normal’ developed out of very different pasts. At a time of mounting concern about the state of the environment, Tom Williamson argues that understanding the historical nature of nature is of critical importance.

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Co-production, Crowd-sourcing & the History of Railway Casualties

Co-production, Crowd-sourcing & the History of Railway Casualties

The Railway Work, Life & Death project has been  using crowd-sourcing and working with volunteers to co-produce research questions and topics. In this post for the RHS, the project team of Karen Baker, Mike Esbester and Helen Ford share a great example of how large numbers of people can collaborate on an historical topic which might appear on the surface to be quite niche: accidents involving British and Irish railway workers.

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Historians and Sustainability

Historians and Sustainability

How can historians respond to the demands of a career that can be both environmentally – and emotionally – unsustainable? In this post for the RHS, Toby Green and Simon Sleight introduce their working paper on “Historians and Sustainability”.

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Bloody Bunce: A Legacy of the Transatlantic Slave Trade in Sierra Leone

Bloody Bunce: A Legacy of the Transatlantic Slave Trade in Sierra Leone

Four hundred years ago, in 1619, the first African slaves landed in the United States. The 1619 Project has made an important contribution to our understanding of the legacy of slavery in the United States, but there has been less conversation about the places where the slaves were taken from. In this post for the RHS Historical Transactions blog, Joseph Kaifala, founder of the Jeneba Project and co-founder of the Sierra Leone Memory Project, contributes a personal piece from Bunce island.

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The RHS Race, Ethnicity and Equality Report: One Year On

The RHS Race, Ethnicity and Equality Report: One Year On

It has been a year since the publication of the RHS’s Race, Ethnicity & Equality in UK History: A Report and Resource for Change (2018). In this post, Shahmima Akhtar, Past and Present Fellow, reflects on the work that has been done in this area, and our hopes for the future.

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Getting Heads Together: Reflections on the first RHS History HoDs Meeting

Getting Heads Together: Reflections on the first RHS History HoDs Meeting

What’s it like to head up a History department? What challenges and opportunities do History HoDs face, and what’s the best way of responding to them? In May 2019, over 20 Heads of UK History departments gathered under the auspices of the RHS to compare notes, share good practice and brainstorm tricky issues. In this post, Professor Abigail Woods, Head of the Department of History at KCL, and organiser of the first meeting, reflects on the discussions.

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