De Montfort University Launches Stephen Lawrence Research Centre

On 22 April 2019 the nation officially acknowledged the first annual Stephen Lawrence Day.  The day served as a day of remembrance, reflection and educational impact concerning the life and legacy of Stephen Lawrence, a Black teenager murdered in a racist attack in 1993 while awaiting a bus in Eltham, South London. Here, Dr Kennetta Hammond Perry explains the significance of the  Lawrence family’s work, and introduces the new Stephen Lawrence Research Centre at De Montfort University, Leicester, opened officially by Baroness Doreen Lawrence on 9 May 2019.

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Cultures of secrecy and transparent archives?

In April 2019, during  a panel discussion at Australia’s Parliament House, Anne Twomey, Professor of Constitutional Law at the University of Sydney, declared that the National Archives of Australia (NAA) have become ‘completely dysfunctional’. This was due to failures in procedures for sensitivity reviewing government files in order to provide access. Twomey argued that this was symptomatic of a ‘culture of secrecy’ which was ‘a serious problem when it comes to transparency in government’. In this post, Richard Dunley argues that this developing culture of secrecy is, paradoxically, a direct product of drives for transparency.  Continue reading “Cultures of secrecy and transparent archives?”

In All Our Footsteps: Tracking Walking Histories in Post-War Britain

May is National Walking Month. In this piece, Clare Hickman and Glen O’ Hara reflect on their new collaborative project which has emerged from personal as well as academic interests in walking, and has led them to reflect on the intersections of environmental, political and health histories. Continue reading “In All Our Footsteps: Tracking Walking Histories in Post-War Britain”

The Emperor, His Castle and Modern Japan.

On May 1, 2019, Prince Naruhito (b. 1960) becomes the emperor of Japan following the abdication of his father, emperor Akihito (b. 1933), after a thirty-year reign. The enthronement ceremonies will take place in the Imperial Palace, a vast former castle complex that dominates the centre of Tokyo. Yet, the new emperor will only be the fifth to reside in Tokyo, after the so-called Meiji Restoration of 1868 saw the imperial institution move to the “Eastern Capital” following more than a millennium in the ancient city of Kyoto. In this blog post, Oleg Benesch explains the history and significance of this modern imperial location. Continue reading “The Emperor, His Castle and Modern Japan.”

Write for the RHS Historical Transactions Blog!

In 2018, as part of the commemoration of the Royal Historical Society’s 150th Anniversary, we established Historical Transactions, an open-access online blog. The aim was to complement our traditional forms of History publication, publicise the work of the Society and showcase the research and ideas of our Fellows, Members, and other historians. The blog now has a new editor, and we would like to hear from you! Continue reading “Write for the RHS Historical Transactions Blog!”