Beyond Peterloo: The Founding of the Manchester Guardian

It is well-known that the events of the Peterloo Massacre, which occurred two hundred years ago today, on 16 August 1819, inspired the founding of the Manchester Guardian. These roots are today still recognised by the Guardian (which the Manchester Guardian would later become). However, a closer look at the original prospectus reveals that despite being founded in the wake Peterloo, the events of 16th August 1819 and the cause of parliamentary reform were not the only motives behind the newspaper’s establishment. In this post, Kathy Davies, a PhD student in History at Sheffield Hallam University, looks more closely at the Manchester Guardian’s long-standing concern with foreign politics. Continue reading “Beyond Peterloo: The Founding of the Manchester Guardian”

Beyond This Day – 8 August 1940: Popular History and the Power Sisters

The historian Eileen Power died on 8 August 1940. In this blog post, Dr Laura Carter examines the historical legacy of Rhoda Power, Eileen’s younger sister (pictured above). In the decades following Eileen’s death, Rhoda continued to shape popular social history in Britain in quite distinctive ways that have been overshadowed by Eileen’s immortalisation as the emblematic twentieth-century woman historian. Continue reading “Beyond This Day – 8 August 1940: Popular History and the Power Sisters”

Beyond this Day – 6 May 1919: The Third Anglo-Afghan War and the Attack on “Warlike” Pathans.

Monday, 6 May 2019 marks a hundred years since the outbreak of the Third Anglo-Afghan War (6 May – 8 August 1919). In the first of a new series of posts examining the histories beyond significant dates, Kate Imy (Assistant Professor of History, University of North Texas) examines the significance of the conflict in the context of the World War that preceded it, and the longer history of British military recruitment of, and violence against, Pathans in the region. Continue reading “Beyond this Day – 6 May 1919: The Third Anglo-Afghan War and the Attack on “Warlike” Pathans.”

The Emperor, His Castle and Modern Japan.

On May 1, 2019, Prince Naruhito (b. 1960) becomes the emperor of Japan following the abdication of his father, emperor Akihito (b. 1933), after a thirty-year reign. The enthronement ceremonies will take place in the Imperial Palace, a vast former castle complex that dominates the centre of Tokyo. Yet, the new emperor will only be the fifth to reside in Tokyo, after the so-called Meiji Restoration of 1868 saw the imperial institution move to the “Eastern Capital” following more than a millennium in the ancient city of Kyoto. In this blog post, Oleg Benesch explains the history and significance of this modern imperial location. Continue reading “The Emperor, His Castle and Modern Japan.”

Write for the RHS Historical Transactions Blog!

In 2018, as part of the commemoration of the Royal Historical Society’s 150th Anniversary, we established Historical Transactions, an open-access online blog. The aim was to complement our traditional forms of History publication, publicise the work of the Society and showcase the research and ideas of our Fellows, Members, and other historians. The blog now has a new editor, and we would like to hear from you! Continue reading “Write for the RHS Historical Transactions Blog!”